For Immediate Release
April 17, 2009

KDHE Office of Communications
communications@kdheks.gov, 785-296-0461

KDHE to help create jobs by funding
water infrastructure projects across Kansas

American Recovery Act resources will support 39 projects in communities throughout the state

New jobs are coming to the Sunflower State thanks to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment’s (KDHE) selection of 39 projects to improve Kansas’ drinking water infrastructure.  The projects will be funded, in part, through monies provided by the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) of 2009. 

“We’re pleased to be able to help get our economy back on track by creating jobs and bringing revenue to communities across Kansas,” said Roderick L. Bremby, Secretary of KDHE.  “The dollars made available through the American Recovery Act have enabled us to fund more projects than we could on our own, which means that more Kansans will see infrastructure improvements in their communities.”

Earlier this month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it had awarded $19.5 million in ARRA funding to KDHE to improve drinking water infrastructure across the state.  The funds went to Kansas’ Drinking Water State Revolving Fund program which provides low-interest loans to finance infrastructure improvements for drinking water systems.

KDHE plans to supplement the $19.5 million in ARRA funding with other funds from its Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, to fund 39 projects costing just over $53 million.   ARRA requires that a percentage of the funding be awarded with principal forgiveness.  Each of the 39 selected projects includes some portion of funding on which the principal will be forgiven.  By supplementing the ARRA funding, KDHE is extending the benefits of principal forgiveness to more Kansas communities. The remainder of each project’s funding is being provided as a low-interest loan.

At least 20 percent of the funds provided under ARRA are to be used for green infrastructure, water and energy efficiency improvements and other environmentally innovative projects.  Some of those components found in the 39 selected projects include the reduction of excessive water loss, increases in energy efficiency, generation of clean or renewable energy for use at the facilities or in the systems, and the installation of water meters capable of automated reading.

Cities and counties across Kansas submitted 143 project proposals for funding consideration. Proposals were reviewed by KDHE staff who made the selections based on readiness to proceed and the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund project priority ranking system.

The projects selected to receive funding are:

City of Arkansas City
Estimated cost: $1.65 million
Two projects were selected, one will install new transmission mains to serve a hospital in the community and the second will allow redundancy for better use of existing storage.

City of Atchison
Estimated cost:  $3.6 million
Two projects were selected, one will replace aging and deteriorated waterlines in the city and the second will replace a pumpstation which will reduce excessive water loss and increase energy efficiency.

City of Bentley
Estimated cost: $480,000
The City’s current water supply source needs to be discontinued due to water quality concerns. This project will construct a water line from the distribution system to different wells which will have water quality that meets primary drinking water standards.

City of Cherryvale
Estimated cost: $812,000
This project will replace aging and deteriorating waterlines and install automated meter reading equipment to reduce water loss and improve system pressures.

City of Coffeyville
Estimated Cost:  $720,000
Three projects were selected, one will install mixers in existing storage reservoirs to maintain adequate chlorine residual, the second project will replace valves in the water treatment plant yard piping for efficient operation, and the third project will replace clarifier equipment in the water treatment plant that has reached its useful life.  Two of the three projects all include security improvements to the system.

City of Conway Springs
Estimated cost: $3.2 million
The City drinking water supply exceeds the drinking water standard for nitrates.  This project will address that problem by constructing a water treatment plant to improve water quality and meet primary drinking water standards.

Douglas County RWD #2
Estimated cost $1.2 million
This project will replace waterlines to increase distribution system pressures to meet KDHE requirements.

City of El Dorado
Estimated cost: $200,000
This project will insert a hydroelectric generator into the City’s raw water pipeline to generate approximately 100 kilowatts of clean energy for use at the water treatment plant.

City of Emporia
Estimated project cost: $1.8 million
This project will rehabilitate and expand the existing water treatment plant to meet system demands.

City of Galena
Estimated cost: $165,000
Two projects were selected, the first will replace aging and deteriorating waterlines to reduce water loss and the second will provide service to a medical facility under construction.

City of Garnett 
Estimated cost: $1.1 million
This project will install a raw waterline from Cedar Valley Reservoir to the existing water treatment plant.  Water quality is expected to improve using this source and will also allow the City to provide water to surrounding communities.

City of Goodland
Estimated cost: $4.5 million
The City drinking water supply exceeds the drinking water standard for nitrates.  This project will address that problem by constructing pipeline to blend water supply wells which will improve water quality and meet primary drinking water standards.

City of Independence
Estimated cost $2.5 million
This project will replace an existing elevated water tower that has reached its useful life.  The new water tower will have increased storage capacity.

Jefferson County RWD #13
Estimated cost: $2.4 million
This project will replace waterlines to increase distribution system pressures to meet KDHE requirements, build new storage capacity to meet system demand, and improve the water treatment plant.

City of Junction City
Estimated cost: $800,000
This project will replace an existing well that has reached the end of its useful life.

City of Kirwin
Estimated cost: $304,000
The City drinking water supply exceeds the drinking water standard for nitrates.  This project will address that problem by installing treatment units at the individual households to improve water quality and meet primary drinking water standards.

City of Lacrosse
Estimated cost: $420,000
This project will replace aging and deteriorated water lines to reduce water loss and maintenance costs.

City of Lakin
Estimated cost: $3.5 million
The City drinking water supply exceeds the drinking water standard for uranium.  To address this problem, this project will construct a water treatment plant to improve water quality and meet primary drinking water standards.

City of Lewis
Estimated cost: $800,000
The City drinking water supply exceeds the drinking water standard for nitrates.  To address this problem, this project will construct a central water treatment plant to improve water quality and meet primary drinking water standards.

City of Minneapolis
Estimated cost: $325,000
This project will construct a water line from an existing well to the City’s new water treatment plant.  This will improve source water efficiency by reducing well drawdown and improve water quality to meet secondary drinking water standards.

Nemaha County RWD #3
Estimated cost: $3.7 million
This project will add new wells and transmission lines to the existing distribution system which will increase pressures and meet KDHE requirements.

City of Olathe
Estimated cost: $200,000
This project will make improvements to the water treatment plant filter under drains and replace filter media.

Osage County RWD #5
Estimated cost: $1 million
This project will construct new water distribution mains to increase pressure and meet KDHE requirements.

Osage County RWD #6
Estimated cost: $1.1 million
This project will extend the distribution system to serve 35 existing homes that do not have access to a public water supply system.  It will also increase pressure for current district customers.

City of Otis
Estimated cost: $1.2 million
This project will replace 21,500 feet of deteriorating waterline to reduce water loss, install a telemetry system for efficient operation of wells and pumpstation, install an emergency power generator, and construct wind turbines to supply renewable energy to the system. 

City of Ottawa
Estimated cost: $1.8 million
This project will construct a new clearwell at the existing water treatment plant to improve water quality, storage capabilities and operation practices.

City of Pittsburg
Estimated cost: $8.7 million
This project will rehabilitate and expand the existing water treatment plant to improve treatment processes and install a geothermal heat pump system to reduce utility costs.

Pottawatomie County RWD #4
Estimated Cost: $1.3 million
This project will replace aging and deteriorating waterlines and make improvements to the water treatment plant for more efficient removal of iron and manganese.

City of Russell
Estimated cost: $300,000
This project will replace 2,900 feet of deteriorating waterline to improve water flow and reduce water loss.

City of Seneca
Estimated Cost: $509,000
This project will install looped distribution piping to improve circulation, pressure and water quality.

City of Victoria
Estimated: $750,000
This project will rehabilitate an existing pumpstation, install a standby generator, update telemetry system and replace deteriorated waterlines.  This will result in reduced water loss and efficient pumping.

Water District One of Johnson County
Estimated cost: $2 million
Two projects were selected; the first will replace existing water meters with meters capable of automated reading.  Doing this project will reduce energy consumption by eliminating the need to physically travel to each meter to get readings.  The second project will replace the ferric chloride system at the water treatment plant improving the water treatment plant processes.

City of Yates Center
Estimated project cost: $280,000

This project will rehabilitate the existing water treatment plant to improve water quality and operational efficiency.