Viral Hepatitis Prevention Program



“Hepatitis” means inflammation of the liver, and also refers to a group of viral infections that affect the liver. The most common types are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C, and to a lesser degree, Hepatitis D. Of these, Hepatitis B and C can cause chronic disease.

Viral Hepatitis A (HAV):

How is HAV Transmitted?
Ingestion from fecal matter, even in microscopic amounts, from:

  • Close personal contact with an infected person
  • Sexual contact with an infected person
  • Ingestion of contaminated food or drink

Although anyone can get HAV, certain groups of people in the United States are at higher risk, such as those who:

  • Travel to or live in countries where HAV is common
  • Are men who have sexual contact with other men
  • Use illegal drugs, whether injected or not
  • Have clotting-factor disorders, such as hemophilia
  • Live with someone who has HAV
  • Have oral-anal sexual contact with someone who has HAV

Viral Hepatitis B (HBV):

How is HBV Transmitted?
Contact with infectious blood, semen, and other body fluids, primarily through:

  • Birth to an infected mother
  • Sexual contact with an infected person
  • Sharing of contaminated needles, syringes, or other injection equipment
  • Needlesticks or other sharp instrument injuries

Although anyone can get HBV, some people are at greater risk, such as those who:

  • Have sex with an infected person
  • Have multiple sex partners
  • Have a sexually transmitted disease
  • Are men who have sexual contact with other men
  • Inject drugs or share needles, syringes, or other drug equipment
  • Live with a person who has chronic HBV
  • Are infants born to infected mothers
  • Are exposed to blood on the job
  • Are hemodialysis patients
  • Travel to countries with moderate to high rates of HBV 

Viral Hepatitis C (HCV):
How is HCV Transmitted?
Contact with blood of an infected person, primarily through:

  • Sharing of contaminated needles, syringes, or other injection equipment

Less commonly through:

  • Sexual contact with an infected person
  • Birth to an infected mother
  • Needlestick or other sharp instrument injuries

Some people are at increased risk for HCV, including:

  • Current injection drug users (currently the most common way HCV is spread in the United States)
  • Past injection drug users, including those who injected only one time or many years ago
  • Recipients of donated blood, blood products, and organs (once a common means of transmission but now rare in the United States since blood screening became available in 1992)
  • People who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987
  • Hemodialysis patients or persons who spent many years on dialysis for kidney failure
  • People who received body piercings or tattoos done with non-sterile instruments
  • People with known exposures to HCV, such as
    -Healthcare workers injured by needlesticks
    -Recipients of blood or organs from a donor who tested positive for HCV
  • HIV-infected persons
  • Children born to mothers infected with HCV

Less common risks include:

  • Having sexual contact with a person who is infected with HCV
  • Sharing personal care items, such as razors or toothbrushes, that may have come in contact with the blood of an infected person

Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 4.4 million people in the United States are living with chronic hepatitis B (HBV) or chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection - about 800,000 to 1.4 million people have HBV and an additional 2.7 to 3.9 million people have chronic HCV.
In the State of Kansas all suspected and confirmed viral hepatitides (acute and chronic) are reportable to KDHE by law (K.S.A. 65-118, 65-128, 65-6001 - 65-6007, K.A.R. 28-1-2, 28-1-4, and 28-1-18) by health care providers, hospitals, and laboratories.

FACT SHEETS/PUBLICATIONS

      HEPATITIS DISEASE INVESTIGATION:

      HEPATITIS FACT SHEETS:

      PERINATAL HEPATITIS B PREVENTION PROGRAM:

      HEPATITIS NEWS/PUBLICATIONS:

INFORMATION/EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

      INFORMATIONAL WEBSITES:

      DOCUMENTS:

  • Integrated National Testing and Awareness Days

      EDUCATIONAL/PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS:

SUPPORT SERVICES

      PATIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS:

      SUPPORT GROUPS:

      HELPLINES:

EVENTS/TRAINING

CONTACT INFORMATION

Viral Hepatitis Prevention Coordinator – 785.296.0752
Perinatal Hepatitis B Prevention – 785.368.8208